Whitewater rafting begins in Truckee, business owners hope for a better season as water levels drop

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By Yosi Yahoudai
Founder and Managing Partner

A warm spring is bringing adventurers together as whitewater rafting runs have started.And it’s hopefully a better year for Tahoe Whitewater Rafting business owner Paul Miltner as water levels have dropped.”It’s a little bit more manageable. It is slower compared to that high water that is a little more turbulent, it’s a little bit more potentially risky with the fast-moving cold snow melt,” said a delighted Miltner.Last year’s wet season means he had fewer people going on tours for safety concerns, and their most popular route was closed off to families.But last year’s challenges are expected to stay in the past as visitors come looking for better temperatures.”I’m excited. I feel like it’s going to be fun to have a new experience to have will be interesting,” said high school sophomore Faye Webb, who reaped the benefits of the water flow on Friday.Milton adds that they recently wrapped up a tour guide class, so they’ll be hiring more staff to meet the demand.Another problem some businesses faced last year was shallow water levels just below the Lake Tahoe Dam, which caused some raft rental businesses to stay closed all season.The U.S. District Court Water Master made a few water releases last year, but they were not enough for rafting. A spokesperson with the agency told KCRA that this year they’re preparing to release water from the Tahoe reservoir as soon as they determine the natural flow in the Truckee River is not enough to meet the water flow or snowmelt runoff targets.Although rules don’t allow releases just for rafting purposes, the summer releases would bring enough water to meet the recreational demands.

A warm spring is bringing adventurers together as whitewater rafting runs have started.

And it’s hopefully a better year for Tahoe Whitewater Rafting business owner Paul Miltner as water levels have dropped.

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“It’s a little bit more manageable. It is slower compared to that high water that is a little more turbulent, it’s a little bit more potentially risky with the fast-moving cold snow melt,” said a delighted Miltner.

Last year’s wet season means he had fewer people going on tours for safety concerns, and their most popular route was closed off to families.

But last year’s challenges are expected to stay in the past as visitors come looking for better temperatures.

“I’m excited. I feel like it’s going to be fun to have a new experience to have will be interesting,” said high school sophomore Faye Webb, who reaped the benefits of the water flow on Friday.

Milton adds that they recently wrapped up a tour guide class, so they’ll be hiring more staff to meet the demand.

Another problem some businesses faced last year was shallow water levels just below the Lake Tahoe Dam, which caused some raft rental businesses to stay closed all season.

The U.S. District Court Water Master made a few water releases last year, but they were not enough for rafting.

A spokesperson with the agency told KCRA that this year they’re preparing to release water from the Tahoe reservoir as soon as they determine the natural flow in the Truckee River is not enough to meet the water flow or snowmelt runoff targets.

Although rules don’t allow releases just for rafting purposes, the summer releases would bring enough water to meet the recreational demands.

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About the Author
Yosi Yahoudai is a founder and the managing partner of J&Y. His practice is comprised primarily of cases involving automobile and motorcycle accidents, but he also represents people in premises liability lawsuits, including suits alleging dangerous conditions of public property, third-party criminal conduct, and intentional torts. He also has expertise in cases involving product defects, dog bites, elder abuse, and sexual assault. He earned his Bachelor of Arts from the University of California and is admitted to practice in all California State Courts, and the United States District Court for the Southern District of California. If you have any questions about this article, you can contact Yosi by clicking here.

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