Sutter County 2nd grade teacher will not face charges after teaching while intoxicated, district attorney says

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By Yosi Yahoudai
Founder and Managing Partner

A Sutter County elementary school teacher will not face any criminal charges after she was found to be teaching under the influence last year, according to the district attorney’s office.Second-grade teacher Wendy Munson, 57, was arrested in October 2023 at Nuestro Elementary School in Live Oak after showing signs of being under the influence.Investigators found that Munson’s blood alcohol limit was two times over the legal limit.Video footage showed that Munson drove to school that day. However, the district attorney’s office said it could not be established that Munson was under the influence when she drove to school, as opposed to drinking after arriving.The district attorney’s office also said the requirements for child endangerment charges could not be met as there was no specific information that showed the children in Munson’s class were placed in a position where they were in danger. The potential for a situation to arise does not meet the requirements under the law.”While the District Attorney’s Office agrees that it is highly inappropriate to teach while intoxicated, it is, unfortunately, not illegal,” the office said in a statement.The district attorney’s office said its position regarding criminal charges does not impact any decisions that could be made by Superintendent Bal Dhillon or the Nuestro School District.See more coverage of top California stories here | Download our app.

A Sutter County elementary school teacher will not face any criminal charges after she was found to be teaching under the influence last year, according to the district attorney’s office.

Second-grade teacher Wendy Munson, 57, was arrested in October 2023 at Nuestro Elementary School in Live Oak after showing signs of being under the influence.

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Investigators found that Munson’s blood alcohol limit was two times over the legal limit.

Video footage showed that Munson drove to school that day. However, the district attorney’s office said it could not be established that Munson was under the influence when she drove to school, as opposed to drinking after arriving.

The district attorney’s office also said the requirements for child endangerment charges could not be met as there was no specific information that showed the children in Munson’s class were placed in a position where they were in danger. The potential for a situation to arise does not meet the requirements under the law.

“While the District Attorney’s Office agrees that it is highly inappropriate to teach while intoxicated, it is, unfortunately, not illegal,” the office said in a statement.

The district attorney’s office said its position regarding criminal charges does not impact any decisions that could be made by Superintendent Bal Dhillon or the Nuestro School District.

See more coverage of top California stories here | Download our app.

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About the Author
Yosi Yahoudai is a founder and the managing partner of J&Y. His practice is comprised primarily of cases involving automobile and motorcycle accidents, but he also represents people in premises liability lawsuits, including suits alleging dangerous conditions of public property, third-party criminal conduct, and intentional torts. He also has expertise in cases involving product defects, dog bites, elder abuse, and sexual assault. He earned his Bachelor of Arts from the University of California and is admitted to practice in all California State Courts, and the United States District Court for the Southern District of California. If you have any questions about this article, you can contact Yosi by clicking here.

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