How To Prove Lost Wages In A Car Accident Case

Suppose you have been injured in a car accident. In that case, you are likely experiencing increasing stress in your life due to numerous medical bills, damage to your property, and pain and suffering resulting from the incident. One of the biggest challenges for car accident victims is their inability to return to work due to their injuries, often resulting in lost wages. Insurance companies require documentation that proves all claims for compensation and reimbursement to process a personal injury claim, which can add to the pressure and burden experienced.

Victims can recover all of their legal damages in a personal injury or car accident case. These include the economic damages of the victim, which cover:

  • Medical bills and expenses,
  • Property damage, and
  • Loss of income due to the accident.

Additionally, there are two types of loss of earnings: loss of past wages and loss of future earnings, also known as loss of work capacity.

The wages you would have received from your employer while you cannot work after the accident are part of what can be recovered as damages in a personal injury claim. Whether you’ve missed work for several weeks or several months, all the money you would have earned during that time is considered lost wages. Sick or vacation days may also be included in your claim, especially if you are forced to use these days in recovery.

When proving that you have lost wages as a result of your accident, the following resources may be valuable in filing your claim:

  • Documentation of lost wages, such as pay stubs
  • Medical documents, especially copies of those that you have given to your company
  • Authorizations and documents that testify that your company knows your situation
  • Documentation of any disability in progress

Other employee benefits that may be included in a lost wages claim include financial benefits: contributions to benefit plans, transportation allowances, typical bonus amounts, overtime pay, the ability to attend employee-related training courses, your job, and to receive training that leads to promotions.