Gov. Newsom says Prop 1 money will be available ahead of schedule

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By Yosi Yahoudai
Founder and Managing Partner

California Gov. Gavin Newsom announced $3.3 billion from the state’s recently passed mental health bond measure will soon be available to counties to build more treatment centers and shelter for those who are unhoused and struggling with severe mental illness or addiction. The governor made the announcement Tuesday in Redwood City. The mental health bond measure, also known as Proposition 1, is part of the governor’s efforts to transform California’s mental health system. The measure specifically included a $6.4 billion bond and changes to the way the state’s mental health dollars are spent in order to prioritize shelter and treatment centers. Newsom said counties can begin applying for the funds in July, which he noted is months if not years ahead of schedule. He said from there, counties with approved plans for the funds could see the money within months. “Let’s go, let’s get moving and get these projects forward,” Newsom said in his message to counties. Voters narrowly passed Proposition 1 in March. The governor’s announcement comes weeks after a state audit found his administration spent billions of dollars on homelessness without tracking the effectiveness of those funds. California has seen a rise in homelessness, despite money spent on the issue over the last several years. State lawmakers recently grilled the administration for its inability to provide data on the effectiveness of its spending on the issue. When asked about mounting public pressure, the governor said, “I don’t look at it from a political paradigm.” “I think all that matters is producing results that people of this state deserve and people that are struggling expect and deserve,” the governor said. “The results should speak for themselves.” See more coverage of top California stories here | Download our app.

California Gov. Gavin Newsom announced $3.3 billion from the state’s recently passed mental health bond measure will soon be available to counties to build more treatment centers and shelter for those who are unhoused and struggling with severe mental illness or addiction.

The governor made the announcement Tuesday in Redwood City.

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The mental health bond measure, also known as Proposition 1, is part of the governor’s efforts to transform California’s mental health system. The measure specifically included a $6.4 billion bond and changes to the way the state’s mental health dollars are spent in order to prioritize shelter and treatment centers.

Newsom said counties can begin applying for the funds in July, which he noted is months if not years ahead of schedule. He said from there, counties with approved plans for the funds could see the money within months.

“Let’s go, let’s get moving and get these projects forward,” Newsom said in his message to counties.

Voters narrowly passed Proposition 1 in March. The governor’s announcement comes weeks after a state audit found his administration spent billions of dollars on homelessness without tracking the effectiveness of those funds. California has seen a rise in homelessness, despite money spent on the issue over the last several years.

State lawmakers recently grilled the administration for its inability to provide data on the effectiveness of its spending on the issue.

When asked about mounting public pressure, the governor said, “I don’t look at it from a political paradigm.”

“I think all that matters is producing results that people of this state deserve and people that are struggling expect and deserve,” the governor said. “The results should speak for themselves.”

See more coverage of top California stories here | Download our app.

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About the Author
Yosi Yahoudai is a founder and the managing partner of J&Y. His practice is comprised primarily of cases involving automobile and motorcycle accidents, but he also represents people in premises liability lawsuits, including suits alleging dangerous conditions of public property, third-party criminal conduct, and intentional torts. He also has expertise in cases involving product defects, dog bites, elder abuse, and sexual assault. He earned his Bachelor of Arts from the University of California and is admitted to practice in all California State Courts, and the United States District Court for the Southern District of California. If you have any questions about this article, you can contact Yosi by clicking here.

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