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Woman loses hundreds of dollars trying to get Savannah Bananas tickets

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By Yosi Yahoudai
Founder and Managing Partner

GAME. TED. WELL, MARIA THIS WEEKEND, NO DOUBT BOSTON POLICE ARE WARNING PEOPLE TO STEER CLEAR OF FAKE 2020 FOR GAME TWO. TICKETS AROUND TOWN. BUT THERE WAS ANOTHER GAME THIS WEEKEND AND A SOLD OUT EVENT. IT’S A SOLD OUT FENWAY PARK SATURDAY NIGHT. NOT FOR THE RED SOX, BUT FOR THE SAVANNAH BANANAS WORLD TOUR THIS TRAVELING BASEBALL SHOW IS HUGE WITH KIDS AND ADULTS. HOW AM I THE IDIOT THAT GETS SCAMMED? I SHOULD KNOW BETTER. CHERYL FROM WEYMOUTH SHARED HER STORY WITH US IN JANUARY. SHE WENT ONLINE LOOKING FOR BANANA TICKETS FOR JUNE 8TH AT FENWAY, ASKING A WOMAN ON FACEBOOK, HOW MUCH ARE YOU ASKING FOR THEM? THE SELLER SAYS $50 EACH. EVEN SHOWS THE SECTION, ROW AND SEATS SHE’S WILLING TO SELL. CHERYL WANTS UP TO EIGHT SEATS IN THE ONLINE SCAMMER SAYS MY UNCLE WORKS IN THE BANANAS OFFICE, SO IT WAS SUPER EASY TO GET THE TICKETS. WE WERE LOOKING FORWARD TO A FUN NIGHT. WE WERE GOING OUT, YOU KNOW, HAVING DINNER. CHERYL AND THE SCAMMER AGREE TO USE VENMO AS A PAYMENT OPTION. EIGHT TICKETS FOR $500. CHERYL THINKS SHE HAS THE ONLINE TICKETS IN HAND WITH A BARCODE. THEY LOOK LEGIT, RIGHT? UNTIL SHE TRIES TO GET INTO FENWAY TO SEE THE WORLD FAMOUS SAVANNAH BANANAS. AND CUSTOMER SERVICE HAS BAD NEWS FOR HER. JUST BEFORE GAME TIME, SHE’S TOLD ME THAT THEY’RE NOT REAL, LEGITIMATE SECONDARY TICKET BROKERS LIKE JOHN HIGGINS FROM HIGGS TICKETS HAS THIS ADVICE FOR ALL TICKET BUYERS, ESPECIALLY THE NBA FINALS. GET YOUR TICKETS FROM A REPUTABLE COMPANY. DON’T BE GOING TO CRAIGSLIST. THERE’S A LOT OF SCAMMERS OUT THERE. WHEN THE NBA FINALS COME IN TOWN. UH, DEFINITELY USE YOUR CREDIT CARD AND, UM, BUY FROM A REPUTABLE COMPANY. GO BACK LIVE. NOW YOU ARE LOOKING AT THE DIGITAL TICKET THAT CHERYL GOT IN THE STORY WE’RE TALKING ABOUT. BUT YOU SE

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Woman scammed out of $500 trying to get Savannah Bananas tickets

The fun-loving, barnstorming baseball team played in front of a sold-out crowd at Fenway Park

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Updated: 10:21 PM PDT Jun 10, 2024

A Massachusetts woman says she spent hundreds of dollars on tickets to Saturday’s sold-out Savannah Bananas game at Fenway Park in Boston that wound up being counterfeits.A Weymouth, Massachusetts, resident named Cheryl said that when she was searching for tickets, she encountered a woman on Facebook who was initially offering tickets at $50 each.When Cheryl indicated she wanted up to eight seats, the Facebook user wrote: “My uncle works in the Bananas office, so it was super easy to get the tickets.””We were looking forward to a fun night and going out, having dinner,” Cheryl said.Cheryl said she agreed to use Venmo as a payment option and wound up getting the eight tickets for $500.The digital tickets Cheryl received had a QR code that looked legitimate, but she and her guests were unable to get into the Bananas game. The customer service team at Fenway Park then informed her that the QR codes on her tickets were bogus.”She’s the one that told me they’re not real,” Cheryl said. “How am I the idiot that gets scammed? I should know better.”Cheryl said she is now working with her bank and Venmo to get the $500 she spent on the fake tickets back.Legitimate secondary ticket brokers like John Higgins, of Higs Tickets, suggest that fans get their tickets from a reputable company, especially during big events like the Bananas game at Fenway Park and NBA Finals games at TD Garden.”Don’t be going to Craigslist. There’s a lot of scammers out there when the NBA Finals come in town,” Higgins said. “Definitely use your credit card and buy from a reputable company.”Before the Boston Celtics and Dallas Mavericks faced off in the NBA Finals, the Boston Police Department issued a warning to fans about counterfeit tickets in the secondary market. They issued a similar warning before the Celtics and Boston Bruins started their playoff runs this spring.

A Massachusetts woman says she spent hundreds of dollars on tickets to Saturday’s sold-out Savannah Bananas game at Fenway Park in Boston that wound up being counterfeits.

A Weymouth, Massachusetts, resident named Cheryl said that when she was searching for tickets, she encountered a woman on Facebook who was initially offering tickets at $50 each.

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When Cheryl indicated she wanted up to eight seats, the Facebook user wrote: “My uncle works in the Bananas office, so it was super easy to get the tickets.”

“We were looking forward to a fun night and going out, having dinner,” Cheryl said.

Cheryl said she agreed to use Venmo as a payment option and wound up getting the eight tickets for $500.

The digital tickets Cheryl received had a QR code that looked legitimate, but she and her guests were unable to get into the Bananas game. The customer service team at Fenway Park then informed her that the QR codes on her tickets were bogus.

“She’s the one that told me they’re not real,” Cheryl said. “How am I the idiot that gets scammed? I should know better.”

Cheryl said she is now working with her bank and Venmo to get the $500 she spent on the fake tickets back.

Legitimate secondary ticket brokers like John Higgins, of Higs Tickets, suggest that fans get their tickets from a reputable company, especially during big events like the Bananas game at Fenway Park and NBA Finals games at TD Garden.

“Don’t be going to Craigslist. There’s a lot of scammers out there when the NBA Finals come in town,” Higgins said. “Definitely use your credit card and buy from a reputable company.”

Before the Boston Celtics and Dallas Mavericks faced off in the NBA Finals, the Boston Police Department issued a warning to fans about counterfeit tickets in the secondary market. They issued a similar warning before the Celtics and Boston Bruins started their playoff runs this spring.

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About the Author
Yosi Yahoudai is a founder and the managing partner of J&Y. His practice is comprised primarily of cases involving automobile and motorcycle accidents, but he also represents people in premises liability lawsuits, including suits alleging dangerous conditions of public property, third-party criminal conduct, and intentional torts. He also has expertise in cases involving product defects, dog bites, elder abuse, and sexual assault. He earned his Bachelor of Arts from the University of California and is admitted to practice in all California State Courts, and the United States District Court for the Southern District of California. If you have any questions about this article, you can contact Yosi by clicking here.