Northern California heat: Sacramento, Stockton, Fairfield record first triple-digit temps of 2024

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By Yosi Yahoudai
Founder and Managing Partner

Highs soared to 100 degrees or more across parts of Northern California on Tuesday, bringing elevated wildfire risk because of winds that accompanied the heat.Meteorologist Kelly Curran said that compared to Monday’s high temperature of 84 degrees, Tuesday would feel like a drastic leap. The average for this time of year is 86 degrees. Here is a round-up of how high the temps got on Tuesday.Sacramento: 100 degreesMarysville: 103 degreesFairfield: 103 degreesStockton: 102 degreesModesto: 99 degreesAuburn: 93 degreesPlacerville: 93 degreesTruckee: 81 degreesSouth Lake Tahoe: 78 degreesThe north winds gusted more than 30 mph on Tuesday, keeping crews busy battling vegetation fires in parts of the region. More triple-digit temps are forecast Wednesday will be even hotter, forecast to reach highs of 100 to 105 degrees across the Central Valley. The hottest parts of the day will be between 2 and 6 p.m. The winds will not be as strong. Regardless, KCRA 3 is also calling Wednesday an Impact Day because of warm overnight temperatures and more triple-digit heat that raises the fire danger. Morning lows are expected in the upper 60s to low 70s on Wednesday. Thursday still looks hot, but temperatures will begin to come down. Expect morning temperatures in the 70s and afternoon temperatures near 100 degrees.(Video below: Know the signs of heat exhaustion and heat stroke.)KCRA 3 Reporter Leticia Ordaz said firefighters are prepared for more people to escape the heat by heading to the waterways. She said crews are urging people to stay sober and wear a lifejacket when on the water to help reduce water rescues on a day when more fires are likely to happen.Temperatures will lower to the 90s heading into the weekend. | MORE | A 2024 guide for how to prepare for wildfires in CaliforniaHere are key websites that are important for all Californians during wildfire season.Cal Fire wildfire incidents: Cal Fire tracks its wildfire incidents here. You can sign up to receive text messages for Cal Fire updates on wildfires happening near your ZIP code here.Wildfires on federal land: Federal wildfire incidents are tracked here.Preparing for power outages: Ready.gov explains how to prepare for a power outage and what to do when returning from one here. Here is how to report track and report PG&E power outages.Keeping informed when you’ve lost power and cellphone service: How to find a National Weather Service radio station near you.Be prepared for road closures: Download Caltrans’ QuickMap app or check the latest QuickMap road conditions here.REAL-TIME TRAFFIC MAPClick here to see our interactive traffic map.TRACK INTERACTIVE, DOPPLER RADARClick here to see our interactive radar.DOWNLOAD OUR APP FOR THE LATESTHere is where you can download our app.Follow our KCRA weather team on social mediaChief meteorologist Mark Finan on Facebook and TwitterMeteorologist Tamara Berg on Facebook and TwitterMeteorologist Dirk Verdoorn on FacebookMeteorologist/Climate Reporter Heather Waldman on Facebook and TwitterMeteorologist Kelly Curran on Twitter.Watch our forecasts on TV or onlineHere’s where to find our latest video forecast. You can also watch a livestream of our latest newscast here. The banner on our website turns red when we’re live.We’re also streaming on the Very Local app for Roku, Apple TV or Amazon Fire TV.

Highs soared to 100 degrees or more across parts of Northern California on Tuesday, bringing elevated wildfire risk because of winds that accompanied the heat.

Meteorologist Kelly Curran said that compared to Monday’s high temperature of 84 degrees, Tuesday would feel like a drastic leap. The average for this time of year is 86 degrees.

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Here is a round-up of how high the temps got on Tuesday.

Sacramento: 100 degreesMarysville: 103 degreesFairfield: 103 degreesStockton: 102 degreesModesto: 99 degreesAuburn: 93 degreesPlacerville: 93 degreesTruckee: 81 degreesSouth Lake Tahoe: 78 degrees

The north winds gusted more than 30 mph on Tuesday, keeping crews busy battling vegetation fires in parts of the region.

More triple-digit temps are forecast

Wednesday will be even hotter, forecast to reach highs of 100 to 105 degrees across the Central Valley. The hottest parts of the day will be between 2 and 6 p.m.

The winds will not be as strong. Regardless, KCRA 3 is also calling Wednesday an Impact Day because of warm overnight temperatures and more triple-digit heat that raises the fire danger.

Morning lows are expected in the upper 60s to low 70s on Wednesday.

Thursday still looks hot, but temperatures will begin to come down. Expect morning temperatures in the 70s and afternoon temperatures near 100 degrees.

(Video below: Know the signs of heat exhaustion and heat stroke.)

KCRA 3 Reporter Leticia Ordaz said firefighters are prepared for more people to escape the heat by heading to the waterways.

She said crews are urging people to stay sober and wear a lifejacket when on the water to help reduce water rescues on a day when more fires are likely to happen.

Temperatures will lower to the 90s heading into the weekend.

| MORE | A 2024 guide for how to prepare for wildfires in California

Here are key websites that are important for all Californians during wildfire season.

REAL-TIME TRAFFIC MAP

Click here to see our interactive traffic map.

TRACK INTERACTIVE, DOPPLER RADAR

Click here to see our interactive radar.

DOWNLOAD OUR APP FOR THE LATEST

Here is where you can download our app.

Follow our KCRA weather team on social media

Watch our forecasts on TV or online

Here’s where to find our latest video forecast. You can also watch a livestream of our latest newscast here. The banner on our website turns red when we’re live.

We’re also streaming on the Very Local app for Roku, Apple TV or Amazon Fire TV.

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About the Author
Yosi Yahoudai is a founder and the managing partner of J&Y. His practice is comprised primarily of cases involving automobile and motorcycle accidents, but he also represents people in premises liability lawsuits, including suits alleging dangerous conditions of public property, third-party criminal conduct, and intentional torts. He also has expertise in cases involving product defects, dog bites, elder abuse, and sexual assault. He earned his Bachelor of Arts from the University of California and is admitted to practice in all California State Courts, and the United States District Court for the Southern District of California. If you have any questions about this article, you can contact Yosi by clicking here.