Marysville city leaders move forward with plans to demolish historic hotel that caught fire

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By Yosi Yahoudai
Founder and Managing Partner

City leaders in Marysville have voted to declare a local state of emergency due to a hazardous situation involving a nearly century-old Marysville hotel that caught fire. The purpose of the meeting was to pass a resolution declaring a state of emergency, as the threat of a structure collapse has forced the closure of Highway 70 and E Street through the heart of downtown.”The compromised structural integrity of the Marysville Hotel poses an immediate risk of collapse, which could result in injury or death and property damage to commuters, truckers and businesses adjacent to the building,” read a meeting resolution.What this means is that the city will be reaching out to the California Office of Emergency Services to determine how to move forward with covering costs related to the hotel. It could also lead to getting extra resources to help with traffic issues while the hotel stands.The closures and detours around the hotel are creating disruptions for drivers on multiple side streets, including between 3rd and 4th Streets along Highway 70.Several demolition firms will be on site Monday, June 24, to look at the hotel and give an estimated cost for the operation.When asked for a timeline of Highway 70’s reopening, City Manager Jim Schaad responded by saying, “That is the big question.”Schaad explained progress on reopening cannot be made until the building has been addressed. All businesses and properties within 105 feet of the hotel were told to vacate. Currently, there are no physical barriers keeping people out of the 105-feet zone.The city also confirmed that a person with a knife was apprehended after they were seen in the hotel building on Thursday.City leaders are also suggesting that Urban Smart Growth, the hotel’s property owner, should be responsible for covering the costs. They explained that the company has not shown initiative in accepting responsibility.Urban Smart Growth does not have casualty insurance — only liability — but should have the resources to cover the costs, city leaders said. The fire happened Saturday, June 15, around 9:30 p.m., Marysville Fire Chief Kyle Heggstrom said.An engineering firm declared the building structurally unsound, which resulted in a prolonged closure.Schaad confirmed Thursday that the city had rejected an offer from the owner of the historic Hotel Marysville to donate the property to the city following the fire.See more coverage of top California stories here | Download our app.

City leaders in Marysville have voted to declare a local state of emergency due to a hazardous situation involving a nearly century-old Marysville hotel that caught fire.

The purpose of the meeting was to pass a resolution declaring a state of emergency, as the threat of a structure collapse has forced the closure of Highway 70 and E Street through the heart of downtown.

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“The compromised structural integrity of the Marysville Hotel poses an immediate risk of collapse, which could result in injury or death and property damage to commuters, truckers and businesses adjacent to the building,” read a meeting resolution.

What this means is that the city will be reaching out to the California Office of Emergency Services to determine how to move forward with covering costs related to the hotel. It could also lead to getting extra resources to help with traffic issues while the hotel stands.

The closures and detours around the hotel are creating disruptions for drivers on multiple side streets, including between 3rd and 4th Streets along Highway 70.

Several demolition firms will be on site Monday, June 24, to look at the hotel and give an estimated cost for the operation.

When asked for a timeline of Highway 70’s reopening, City Manager Jim Schaad responded by saying, “That is the big question.”

Schaad explained progress on reopening cannot be made until the building has been addressed. All businesses and properties within 105 feet of the hotel were told to vacate. Currently, there are no physical barriers keeping people out of the 105-feet zone.

The city also confirmed that a person with a knife was apprehended after they were seen in the hotel building on Thursday.

City leaders are also suggesting that Urban Smart Growth, the hotel’s property owner, should be responsible for covering the costs. They explained that the company has not shown initiative in accepting responsibility.

Urban Smart Growth does not have casualty insurance — only liability — but should have the resources to cover the costs, city leaders said.

The fire happened Saturday, June 15, around 9:30 p.m., Marysville Fire Chief Kyle Heggstrom said.

An engineering firm declared the building structurally unsound, which resulted in a prolonged closure.

Schaad confirmed Thursday that the city had rejected an offer from the owner of the historic Hotel Marysville to donate the property to the city following the fire.

See more coverage of top California stories here | Download our app.

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About the Author
Yosi Yahoudai is a founder and the managing partner of J&Y. His practice is comprised primarily of cases involving automobile and motorcycle accidents, but he also represents people in premises liability lawsuits, including suits alleging dangerous conditions of public property, third-party criminal conduct, and intentional torts. He also has expertise in cases involving product defects, dog bites, elder abuse, and sexual assault. He earned his Bachelor of Arts from the University of California and is admitted to practice in all California State Courts, and the United States District Court for the Southern District of California. If you have any questions about this article, you can contact Yosi by clicking here.